Ntuity Case Study


Software waiting to be rebranded 

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Ntuity Case Study


Software waiting to be rebranded 


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Finding the exact right name 


What's in a name? Does it really matter? 

There was a time when companies didn't consider it as the most important asset, as long as the quality of the offering was rock solid. That was the case for Australia-based Technical Software Services Pty Ltd. (TSS), a quiet yet global leader whose clients include Havas, Omnicom Media Group, DDB, and many others.

TSS’s CEO Marshall Duncan knew the time was right to rebrand as part of a global market expansion and the introduction of their latest SaaS/Cloud. The question came down to "how should we name ourselves?"

TSS approached renderbloom leadership seeking help in finding the exact name that would accurately express the unique capabilities of their "intuitive" project management solutions.

The new name would need to resonate with their sophisticated buyers, who themselves are leaders in brand strategy. It would also need to be cleared for global use and preferably have a .com domain, which is most powerful in the cloud software world.

Renderbloom has invested in the registration of future value domains. There was one that fit exactly, and so Ntuity.com was born.

Finding the exact right name 


What's in a name? Does it really matter? 

There was a time when companies didn't consider it as the most important asset, as long as the quality of the offering was rock solid. That was the case for Australia-based Technical Software Services Pty Ltd. (TSS), a quiet yet global leader whose clients include Havas, Omnicom Media Group, DDB, and many others.

TSS’s CEO Marshall Duncan knew the time was right to rebrand as part of a global market expansion and the introduction of their latest SaaS/Cloud. The question came down to "how should we name ourselves?"

TSS approached renderbloom leadership seeking help in finding the exact name that would accurately express the unique capabilities of their "intuitive" project management solutions.

The new name would need to resonate with their sophisticated buyers, who themselves are leaders in brand strategy. It would also need to be cleared for global use and preferably have a .com domain, which is most powerful in the cloud software world.

Renderbloom has invested in the registration of future value domains. There was one that fit exactly, and so Ntuity.com was born.


Naming a brand’s story 


Ask anyone how Google, Amazon, or Apple got their name and you will hear a different story. Each of these brands is among the most recognized on the planet, yet when they first entered the market, they too were unknown, waiting to be branded.

The most important question is, "What's in a name?"

To us, it's everything. For your business, everything revolves around the people who work for you, the products you sell, and the audience you serve.

However, each of those people are stakeholders in a brand name. They can often make or break a brand's success if the brand is not careful to make sure the name remains true to its purpose. It must hold enduring quality for the rest of time and provide an experience of excellence.


So what's in a name?


Well, for the most part, anything can actually be a name. The challenge often lies in trademarks, domain availability, simplicity, and how well a name accurately reflects the DNA of the entrepreneur who started the business, the company that acquired that business, and the customer that brand name represents.

Naming conventions aside, coming up with the best name for a company can be a major drama among stakeholders. In some cases, the name is personal, like naming a child; ultimately, the name you choose and its tag lines can be worth billions.

Take BMW, the ultimate driving machine. The BMW name was itself an evolution of its time and born out of one of their first products: Bayerische Motoren Werke, an airplane, which was followed by a motorcycle, and then the automobile.

What remained consistent was the purpose of the company, regardless of the product itself or the market audience it serve. They would be manufacturers of machines and their purpose, to provide the ultimate driving machine. 

Conduct a Google or Wikipedia search on any popular brand and you will find some interesting story that is embedded in the DNA of a brand name. Each has a story it tells and that story is the foundation of the reason why customers and the audiences they enlighten come back to the brand seeking a new experience every time. 


Let's think back to the .com bubble


The dot.com bubble in 2000-2001 was fraught with every imaginable name that could be “.com’ed” -- if you can get a great name and a great internet domain address, you would be set for life. 

Not so fast for Pets.com or, for that matter, amazing brands like digital.com. Pet.com never made it, having blown through cash, being focused on the promotion and marketing and somehow forgetting the fundamentals of the business.

Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) was an American computer industry icon whose trademark name Digital was 50 years ahead of its time. However, like so many companies, the assets and brand were gobbled up, never to survive again. There are only so many brand names a company can sustain with equity. 

In the case of Australia-based Technical Software Services Pty Ltd. (TSS), they had a compelling reason to change the name of their extremely well-respected firm.

They quietly accumulated an envious stable of highly respected customers in the AsiaPacific and, to a lesser extent, the emerging European market. They wanted to expand, and felt the time was right to rename the company.

Ntuity.com


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Naming a brand’s story 


For generations, the approach to educating students had been a series of rinse and repeat, somewhat "textbook" based curriculum development. Major suppliers of content, like London-based Pearson and New York-based McGraw-Hill, have to this day dominated the landscape of textbook education products. The general thinking is, this approach to curriculum delivery has worked. However, in reality, successful student grade outcomes and performance is not textbook.  

So what's in a name?


Well, for the most part, anything can actually be a name. The challenge often lies in trademarks, domain availability, simplicity, and how well a name accurately reflects the DNA of the entrepreneur who started the business, the company that acquired that business, and the customer that brand name represents.

Naming conventions aside, coming up with the best name for a company can be a major drama among stakeholders. In some cases, the name is personal, like naming a child; ultimately, the name you choose and its tag lines can be worth billions.

Take BMW, the ultimate driving machine. The BMW name was itself an evolution of its time and born out of one of their first products: Bayerische Motoren Werke, an airplane, which was followed by a motorcycle, and then the automobile.

What remained consistent was the purpose of the company, regardless of the product itself or the market audience it serve. They would be manufacturers of machines and their purpose, to provide the ultimate driving machine. 

Conduct a Google or Wikipedia search on any popular brand and you will find some interesting story that is embedded in the DNA of a brand name. Each has a story it tells and that story is the foundation of the reason why customers and the audiences they enlighten come back to the brand seeking a new experience every time. 


Let's think back to the .com bubble


The dot.com bubble in 2000-2001 was fraught with every imaginable name that could be “.com’ed” -- if you can get a great name and a great internet domain address, you would be set for life. 

Not so fast for Pets.com or, for that matter, amazing brands like digital.com. Pet.com never made it, having blown through cash, being focused on the promotion and marketing and somehow forgetting the fundamentals of the business.

Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) was an American computer industry icon whose trademark name Digital was 50 years ahead of its time. However, like so many companies, the assets and brand were gobbled up, never to survive again. There are only so many brand names a company can sustain with equity. 

In the case of Australia-based Technical Software Services Pty Ltd. (TSS), they had a compelling reason to change the name of their extremely well-respected firm.

They quietly accumulated an envious stable of highly respected customers in the AsiaPacific and, to a lesser extent, the emerging European market. They wanted to expand, and felt the time was right to rename the company.

Ntuity.com

Engage


As part of our engagement, we provided guidance to Ntuity leadership on the challenge to expand beyond their well-established markets in the AsiaPacific region.

Renderbloom conducted an independent market research study to determine feasibility, and to identify what new investments would be required to engage a broader audience.

Enable


With TSS software available in the cloud, this meant the company could more easily expand into new geographies, formulate new partnerships, and increase the brand equity of the firm.

Renderbloom initially helped TSS set-up a North American presence, and we continue to this day to support their North American requirements.    

Empower


Armed with a new name of substance, Ntuity continues to grow as a global leader with its leading communications management engine for the advertising and media industries.

The new name, Ntuity, paved the way for the company to empower its audience of clients and employees. 

Engage


As part of our engagement, we provided guidance to Ntuity leadership on the challenge to expand beyond their well-established markets in the AsiaPacific region.

Renderbloom conducted an independent market research study to determine feasibility, and to identify what new investments would be required to engage a broader audience.

Enable


With TSS software available in the cloud, this meant the company could more easily expand into new geographies, formulate new partnerships, and increase the brand equity of the firm.

Renderbloom initially helped TSS set-up a North American presence, and we continue to this day to support their North American requirements.    

Empower


Armed with a new name of substance, Ntuity continues to grow as a global leader with its leading communications management engine for the advertising and media industries.

The new name, Ntuity, paved the way for the company to empower its audience of clients and employees. 

Global Blocks can not reference themselves